English


 

English Overview

The basis of the English major is to help students develop the skills and knowledge necessary to read deeply and write fluently. These skills are critical to professional success, regardless of field or industry. Literature and literary criticism are significant parts of ages old, continuing conversation about the meaning and value of human society. Unlike scientific or social scientific approaches to this conversation, literary discourse emphasizes the particular in the dialogue between particular and universal. The study of literature enables one to engage this conversation richly; both for personal development and for the ability it gives one to be a responsible agent in the many societies each person inhabits.

The study of literature enables one to engage this conversation richly; both for personal development and for the ability it gives one to be a responsible agent in the many societies each person inhabits. Moreover, literary study gives one insight into how cultures operate in such a way as to facilitate ethical cross-cultural interactions. Literary study facilitates such agency by teaching readers how to understand – an understanding that engages intellectual, ethical and aesthetic faculties – and then critique literary artifacts.

Upon graduation, students will find themselves prepared for a number of career possibilities, including education, graduate and professional programs, including the fields of law, medicine and business, as well as advertising, editing and publishing, journalism, communications and mass media.

Areas of Research in English

 

  • Literature and humor
  • Medieval and Renaissance drama
  • Performance theory
  • Mark Twain
  • Literature and culture of the Great Depression
  • American nature writing and literature of the environment

Careers

 

Education
Law
Medicine
Business
Journalism
Foreign Service
Advertising
Editing and Publishing

English Learning Outcomes

Upon graduation, our graduates demonstrate:

  1. Interpret texts with due sensitivity to both textural and contextual cues.
  2. Articulate an appreciation of the aesthetic qualities of texts by the standards of their times and places.
  3. Take positions on the ethical questions raised by texts, and defend those positions.
  4. Apply interpretive strategies developed in literary study to other academic and professional contexts.
  5. Write cogently and with sensitivity to audience.

  More Information

School of Social Science, Humanities and Arts

 Staff & Faculty